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Peninsula Paris prepares to open summer 2014

East meets West ... Hong Kong’s Peninsula Hotels enters Europe

HONG Kong-based Peninsula Hotels has announced that its Paris property will open in August 2014, marking the Asian brand’s entry into the European market.

Located just steps away from the Champs Elysées and the Arc de Triomphe, the 33,000 sq m Peninsula Paris has been under development for four years. Previously the Majestic Hotel, renovation works have been carefully carried out to restore its classical century-old Beaux-Arts building to its former glory.

The seven-storey property will offer 200 rooms, including 46 suites. Food and beverage options will include a Chinese restaurant, a French rooftop restaurant, an all-day dining outlet, and a cigar lounge, while an outdoor terrace will provide views to the north side of the property.

The hotel’s 18,000 sq ft spa will include six treatment rooms as well as two VIP couples suites and an indoor pool. The spa area changing rooms will also boast herbal steam rooms and ice fountains.

The hotel’s pool is equipped with underwater mood LED lighting and also has a Jacuzzi. Other leisure facilities include a fully equipped gym.

Business and events are also catered for. The hotel will provide a function room for up to 100 persons, as well as three meeting rooms capable of accommodating up to 48 delegates.

The hotel is 80 per cent owned by Katara Hospitality, previously Qatar National Hotels, who incidentally are also behind the Buddha Bar Hotel in Paris, which opened in June, and Le Royal Monceau – Raffles Paris.

The Buddha Bar Hotel Paris is located on Rue d’Anjou, just steps from Rue du Faubourg Saint Honoré. The five-star hotel offers a modern Asian-Colonial interior design set in a classical Parisian building.

Katara Hospitality acquired Le Royal Monceau – Raffles Paris in 2012. Le Royal Monceau – Raffles Paris reopened in 2010 after a complete transformation under the direction of designer Philippe Starck. The elegant yet witty and colourful interiors recreate the vibrancy of Les Années Folles of the late 1920s when the hotel initially opened, infused with the artistic flair that has attracted casts of artists, intellectuals and adventurers across generations.

By Sarah McCay

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